Tag Archives: disease prevention

2015 White House Conference on Aging

logo-WHCOA2015This is the year for the decennial White House Conference on Aging.  However, the Older Americans Act, which traditionally has outlined the Conference process, has not been reauthorized and the President’s budget has not been approved.  As a result, there are very little structure and no additional funds for the 2015 Conference.

nora-super-140Ms. Nora Super is the Executive Director of the Conference.  Her background includes more than twenty years experience in aging policy and community outreach.  The four themes that have emerged from community input, so far, are Retirement Security, Healthy Aging, Long-Term Services and Supports, and Elder Justice.  There is a blog for the Conference at  http://www.whitehouseconferenceonaging.gov/blog/   A number of regional forums are also scheduled.  The closest one to SE Michigan is the conference in Cleveland, OH on April 27th.

The Administration is using social and electronic media as much as possible to receive grass roots input and conduct informational meetings.  Everyone can participate by going to the web site and signing up to receive notices of events, such as webinars, and opportunities to participate.  You can also provide your thoughts and/or a story about your experience with aging or aging services, such as Medicare, Social Security, or in-home services, by submitting them through the following link:  http://www.whitehouseconferenceonaging.gov/submissions/register.aspx

Here’s the contact information if you have specific questions:

White House Conference on Aging
200 Independence Avenue SW, Suite 637D
Hubert H. Humphrey Building
Washington, DC  20201
(202) 619-3636
info@whaging.gov
www.whitehouseconferenceonaging.gov

Aging touches everyone.  I encourage you to participate in this opportunity for civic engagement at a time when our society includes the greatest proportion of older adults in history.

Sue Sweeney, Chair, Department of Aging Studies, Madonna University

National Council on Aging Funding for Outreach for SNAP

ncoa-logoIn the January 13th issue of the National Council on Aging‘s NCOA Week e-publication, they announced grant proposals for $25,000 or $50,000 to increase enrollment of older adults who are eligible for the federal  Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).  The details of the RFP will be available next week.  As stated in the e-publication, “NCOA soon will be seeking proposals from community-based organizations for Senior SNAP Enrollment Initiative grants in two competitive categories ($25,000 and $50,000). The Request for Proposals will be released on or around Jan. 20. Optional Letters of Intent are due Feb. 13, and applications are due March 6.”

FoodNutrSvcesLogoA 2012 presentation by Lura Barber of the National Center for Benefits Outreach and Enrollment of NCOA is available online.  Called SNAP and Older Adults, the presentation points out that only one out of three eligible older adults are enrolled in SNAP, and provides basic information about SNAP organizational structure, eligibility, application process, and techniques to reach out to older adults who qualify.

Affordable Care Act Across the Generations

ACALogoThe Affordable Care Act is a very complex piece of legislation that is changing the health care landscape.  Jim Luke and I are offering a presentation on some of the significant provisions of the Act on November 12, 2014 from 10 am to 11:30 am for the Michigan Intergenerational Network.  The Villa of Redford is hosting the event at Villa at Redford, Village of Redford, 25340 Six Mile Road, Redford Township, MI 48240.

 

Influenza Trends for 2013-14 Season

CDCLogoThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that everyone over the age of 6 months get the flu shot.  This 2013-14 season a particularly nasty version of influenza, pH1N1, is showing up around the country, with reports of hospitalizations.  In a note to clinicians, issued just before Christmas, the CDC observes that this strain of the flu virus tends to affect young and middle-aged adults more than older adults.  I would guess that older adults may have been exposed to this strain earlier in their lives.  Nonetheless, it’s a good idea to get inoculated, especially if you have any respiratory ailment such as asthma.  Venues in my area of southeastern Michigan seem to have vaccine still available. The vaccinehealthmap can help you locate a place to get the injection that is near you.

The shot is most effective if you are healthy when you receive it, and it takes about two weeks for the body to respond with full immunity. The CDC publishes a weekly flu map, showing the states in which influenza is showing up locally, regionally, or state-wide.  They also publish online an informative flyer on the flu shot called “No More Excuses”, which can help dispel worries about getting inoculated.

Vaccination to prevent illness is an important aspect of primary disease prevention.  Older adults are wise to avoid the risk of complications that can accompany such illnesses as influenza.  We also have a responsibility to those we care about to help keep them healthy and to minimize the extent that they need to take care of us.  Sue Sweeney, Chair, Gerontology Department, Madonna University

Flu + You Campaign

Illness prevention is an important aspect of positive aging.  One of the easier ways to prevent illness is through timely innoculations, such as the flu shot, and early fall is the time to get the shot for optimum protection against influenza.  The National Council on Aging , NCOA, has a very robust toolkit for organizations and groups to use to educate older adults about the benefits of getting the flu shot.  The campaign is called Flu + You, and the toolkit includes a guide, a brochure, a PowerPoint presentation, handout????????????????????????s, and posters, with materials in Spanish, as well as English.  There is also a widget, with HTML coding, that you can place on your Web site which provides updated information on the flu season.   If you don’t want to download the materials, you can order most of them, for free, from the National Council on Aging.  Sue Sweeney, Chair, Gerontology Department, Madonna University 

Fitness for People Over 50

The National Go4LifeInstitute on Aging‘s campaign for exercise and physical activity for mature adults, called Go4Life, has been around for a couple of years.  However, they keep adding new features, like their Twitterstream @NIAGo4Life and online coaches.  You can create an account and track your progress with your fitness plan.  The site also has numerous free resources to download or order, including an exercise guide and a DVD, which can be secured in quantity for distribution to groups of older adults and/or caregivers. They have posters, book marks, tip sheets, and more.  Take advantage of this resource for yourself, your family, and your clients or customers.